City Council To Require Office Of Data Analytics To Study Pay Equity Across Gender, Racial And Ethnic Lines

City Hall – In an effort to eliminate pay disparities among city workers, the New York City Council on Thursday will vote on legislation that will require the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics (MODA) to issue public reports on pay disparities in the municipal workforce. The legislation requires the reports to be issued annually. It also gives the Council direct access to the underlying employment data in order to perform its own analysis and independently verify the report. The goal of this historic legislation is to find and eliminate instances of pay disparity within the city workforce. Pay disparity can be based on gender, race, age, or any other protected class enumerated in the City’s Human Rights Law.

The Council will also vote on a re-zoning of the Garment District to help ensure the longevity of the City’s iconic garment manufacturing industry.

In addition, the Council will vote to require the Department of Correction provide detailed quarterly reporting on incidents of sexual abuse in the City’s correctional facilities. One bill will require reporting on incidents involving visitors, and the other requires reporting on incidents involving incarcerated persons.

The Council will also vote to require the Department of Sanitation establish an organic waste collection pilot program for buildings that are wholly occupied by city agencies.

Additionally, the Council will vote on legislation prohibiting discrimination by employers based on the sexual and reproductive health decisions of employees.

The Council will vote to change certain Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings (OATH) procedures relating to Taxi and Limousine Commission hearings, this will help alleviate the administrative and financial burden faced by drivers who have OATH hearings.

Additionally, the Council will vote to apply the changes to the campaign finance system, established by Ballot Question #1 of the 2018 Election, to elections held prior to the 2021 primary election.

Finally, the Council will vote on several finance and land use items.

Requiring Reporting of Pay and Employment Equity Data

Introduction 633, sponsored by Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo, would require the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics (MODA) report on an annual basis, aggregated data from every City agency looking at gender, ethnicity and race at $2,500, $5,000 and $10,000 pay bands to find instances of pay disparities. After receiving the data from DCAS, MODA would issue a report to the Mayor and the Speaker, and post this same report publicly on the MODA and Open NY websites. The Council, on an annual basis, will be given 90-day access, through a computer application, to employment level data for all City workers to conduct its own statistical analysis to find instances of pay disparities across City agencies.

“Women represent half of our city’s population and workforce; and yet we have been shortchanged by the very economic system that flourishes because of our contributions. Women in New York City can no longer afford to be nickeled and dimed while we are the ones holding down our communities, households, and families; we are thriving in the work force,” said Majority Leader, New York City Council Member, Laurie A. Cumbo.

New York City women earn $5.8 billion less than men annually and the gap grows wider for women of color.Technology continues to widen the pay gap and fewer women working in high-growth areas such as IT, biotech and infrastructure perpetuates the gender pay inequity cycle.

“We must find ways to open up the fields that are burgeoning and begin efforts early, promoting STEM for Black girls and young women, boldly rejecting any notions that these areas of study and work are not for them. As we close out 2018, I would like to acknowledge Speaker Corey Johnson, the advocates and CWA Local 1180 for their continued advocacy and belief that together, we can chart a new path towards equal pay,” added Cumbo.

“After years of contentious legal battles and tense negotiations, we have passed landmark legislation that strengthens our efforts to combat institutional racism and unconscious bias in how our City values the work done by women and people of color within its workforce,” said Council Member I. Daneek Miller, Committee on Civil Service and Labor Chair. “Introduction 633 lifts the curtain on the extreme pay disparities that have limited the upward mobility and earning potential of these dedicated members who toiled for generations only to see their ascent slowed by a deep-seated culture of nepotism, privilege, and sexism; promoting a civil service system that is genuinely merit based. I want to thank Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo, Public Advocate Letitia James, CWA 1180, and our Speaker Corey Johnson for their collaboration in achieving a hard fought and long-awaited victory for the women and minorities unjustly passed over for promotion and denied their basic right to receive equal pay for equal work.”

Requiring the Department of Corrections to Report on Sexual Abuse Involving Incarcerated Individuals

Introduction 933-A, sponsored by Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo, would require the Department of Correction to provide detailed, public,quarterly reports on incidents of sexual abuse involving incarcerated individuals.

Requiring the Department of Corrections to Report on Allegations of Sexual Abuse and Sexual Harassment on Visitors

Introduction 1090, sponsored by Council Member Daniel Dromm, would require the Department of Correction to issue a quarterly report regarding complaints of sexual abuse on visitors to city jails, and on the training of staff regarding searches of visitors.

“My bill will help lawmakers and the public gain a better understanding of sexual abuse in city jails and what the Department of Correction is doing to prevent it,” said Council Member Daniel Dromm. “Family and friends of incarcerated people should never have to endure sexual abuse while visiting loved ones. This legislation will help shed light on a problem that for too long has been enshrouded in darkness.  I thank Speaker Johnson and the many advocates who worked with me on this effort to bring us closer to a safe jail system.”

Prohibiting Employment Discrimination Based on an Individual’s Reproductive Health Choices

Introduction 863-A, sponsored by Council Member Jumaane Williams, would prohibit employer discrimination based on an individual’s sexual and reproductive health decisions. Sexual and reproductive health decisions would be defined as any decision by an individual to receive services that relate to the reproductive system and its functions.The bill would clarify that like pregnancy related discrimination,discrimination based on seeking services such as fertility testing, abortion or other family planning services, is prohibited in the workplace.

“In an environment where the GOP in Congress, the White House, and the Court threaten the civil rights that we fought for over decades, New York City needs to stand in defense of reproductive rights,” said Council Member Jumaane D. Williams. “But rights that can be undercut by reproductive retribution and discrimination are not rights at all- and it’s time we took a stand against reproductive injustice. I thank Majority Leader Cumbo, Council Members Rosenthal, Rivera, Rose and Chin, the Women’s Caucus, and of my colleagues for their support of this bill, and the Speaker for recognizing the importance of enshrining these protections into law.”

Establishing an Organics Collection Pilot Program

Introduction 1075-A, sponsored by Public Advocate Letitia James, would mandate the Department of Sanitation to establish a pilot program to collect organic waste from buildings wholly occupied by one or more city agencies and institutional special use buildings.

Changing certain Taxi and Limousine Commission-Related Hearing Procedures of the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings

Introduction 748, sponsored by Council Member Fernando Cabrera, would alleviate administrative and financial burdens that livery drivers face at OATH hearings, by streamlining the hearing process, requiring that petitioners be represented at hearings,allowing drivers to appear at hearings remotely, and by giving OATH administrative law judges and hearing officers the discretion to reduce penalties in the interest of justice.

“In a short time, we have lost eight taxi drivers to suicide.  Many more are living daily with crushing financial burdens and decreasing incomes. These stresses are worsened by excessively time consuming and onerous processes for answering summonses for violations. Many of our drivers are immigrants whose hard work and aspirations are thwarted when they lose income waiting for hours or having to return to answer a summons. Intro 748-A maintains enforcement standards while reducing unnecessary hardships on drivers. This bill ensures that drivers can earn a decent living, realize the ‘American Dream’ and answer for violations in a fair and equitable manner,” said Council Member Fernando Cabrera

Ensuring Consistency in the City’s Campaign Finance Laws

Introduction 1288-A, sponsored by Council Member Ben Kallos, would apply the campaign finance system changes recently approved by voters to covered elections prior to the 2021 primaries, including the special elections to be held next year.

“On November 6th more than one million voters demanded fewer big dollars in New York City elections,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “We must start with the next Public Advocate, he or she could be the first city-wide elected without the influence of big dollars from real estate developers, elected instead on small dollars given by the people.Thank you to Speaker Johnson for his commitment to improving the system and for helping usher this legislation through in time to give candidates the option.”

Street Co-Namings and Public Places

The Council will also vote on Preconsidered Int. No. 1300, in relation to the naming of 68 thoroughfares and public places. These co-namings include Chief of Detectives William Alee, Chief Ronald Spadafora, and Police Officer Manuel “Manny” Vargas, who all died of illnesses related to their service on 9/11; and the cultural icons, Christopher”Biggie Smalls” Wallace, the Wu-Tang Clan, and Woody Guthrie.

The City Council will also vote on the following finance item(s):

Extending the Time for the Submission of the Fiscal Year 2020 Preliminary Budget

Preconsidered Introduction, sponsored by Council Member Dromm by request of the Mayor, would extend the Charter-mandated submission dates for Fiscal 2020 Preliminary Budget-related documents and actions, most notably extended the submission date for the Fiscal 2020 Preliminary Budget to February 7, 2019.

The Council will also vote on
the following Article XI Property Tax Exemptions:

Langsam 1.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 52 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 2.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Gjonaj’s district, is to preserve 49 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 3.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Diaz’s district, is to preserve 48 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 4.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 63 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 5.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 63 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 6.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 63 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 7.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Salamanca’s district, is to preserve 13 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 8.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Gibson’s district, is to preserve 58 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 9.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 52 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 10.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Diaz’s district, is to preserve 51 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 11.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 43 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 12.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cohen’s district is to preserve 48 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 13.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cabrera’s district, is to preserve 43 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 14.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Salamanca’s district, is to preserve 49 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 16.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cohen’s district, is to preserve 65 units of affordable housing.

55 E Mosholu Parkway.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cohen’s district, is to preserve 44 units of affordable housing.

3240 Henry Hudson Parkway.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cohen’s district, is to preserve 107 units of affordable housing.

1425 Macombs Road.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Gibson’s district, is to preserve 38 units of affordable housing.

36-38 West Gun Hill Road .

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Cohen’s district, is to preserve 45 units of affordable housing.

Cooper Square Senior Housing.

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Rivera’s district, is to preserve 151 units of affordable housing.

The City Council will also vote on the following land use items:

Garment Center Rezoning

The Council will vote to approve zoning text amendments to modify the Special Garment Center District (SGCD) to lift manufacturing preservation requirements that exist on side-street blocks in the SGCD, standardize sign regulations, modify bulk regulations to ensure conformance to historical context, and establish a special permit for hotels in the SGCD. This project is in Council Speaker Johnson’s district.

“Together, we are taking a big step toward ensuring that the garment manufacturing industry has a permanent home in New York City. The Garment District is an integral part of our City’s economy and the New York fashion industry. A wide range of stakeholders have come together to ensure that this industry has a long-term home. I’d like to thank Manhattan Borough President Brewer, New York City Economic Development Corporation President James Patchett, the Garment District steering committee,and so many others who have been crucial in helping make these wins a reality.The Garment District will flourish in the years to come,” said Council Speaker Corey Johnson.

M1 Hotels Text Amendment

The Council will vote to approve with modifications a zoning text amendment to create a Special Permit requirement under Section 74-803 for hotel development within M1 light manufacturing districts. The proposed text amendment would create a new requirement for developers to secure a City Planning Commission Special Permit in order to develop a hotel in M1 districts, requiring full ULURP public review including City Council approval. This is a city-wide zoning text amendment.

1451 Franklin Avenue

The Council will vote to approve a zoning map amendment to rezone a portion of Franklin Avenue between President Street and Montgomery Street, and a Zoning text amendment to Appendix F to establish a Mandatory Inclusionary Housing Area. During negotiations, Majority Leader Cumbo secured commitments from the applicant to increase on-site affordable housing,  as well as to increase future affordable housing developed on an adjacent site.

Marcus Garvey Village

The Council will vote to approve with modifications a rezoning and related applications to facilitate the creation of seven new affordable housing buildings, to be built in three phases, at the Marcus Garvey Village site in Brownsville. These actions will enable the creation of 676 new units of affordable housing, as well as 70,275 square feet of retail and community space. This project is located in Council Member Alicka Ampry-Samuel and Council Member Inez Barron’s districts.

29 Jay Street

The Council will vote to approve with modifications an application for a zoning map and text amendment for 29 Jay Street in DUMBO.  The purpose of this rezoning is to facilitate the construction of a 12-story office building with 12,225 square feet of retail space, at the site of a current non-contributing,one story warehouse. This project is in Council Member Stephen Levin’s district.

432-Seat Primary School &
231-Seat 3k/UPK Facility

The Council will vote to approve a school site selection in Community School District No. 31. This would allow for the acquisition of a private property to facilitate the construction of a 432-seat primary school, and a 231-seat 3K/UPK facility. This project is in Minority Leader Steven Matteo’s district.

380 Seat Primary School – St.
Rosalia Site

The Council will vote to approve a school site selection in Community School District No. 20. This would allow for construction of a 20,900 square foot, 380-seat public primary school to proceed. This project is in Council Member Manchaca’s district.

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