Council to Vote to Create Office of Diversity and Inclusion to Study Equal Employment in City Agencies

City Hall – The New York City Council on Tuesday will vote to create an Office of Diversity and Inclusion within the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS). The Council will also vote to require DCAS to study and report on diversity within city agencies.

In addition, the Council will vote to create a task force to study and make recommendations on Department of Education spending and school funding

The Council will also vote on legislation to clarify the format in which data is present in City reports.

Then the Council will vote on a resolution calling on the New York State Government to establish the New York Health Program.

Finally, the Council will vote on several finance and land use items.

Improving the City’s Reporting and Tracking of Diversity in Employment.

Creating an Office of Diversity and Inclusion Within the Department of Citywide Administrative Services

Introduction 752, sponsored by Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo, would create an Office of Diversity and Inclusion within the Department of Citywide Administrative Services. The Office is tasked with compiling and releasing employment statistics related to hiring, salary and promotion of city employees, disaggregated by gender, race, civil service title classification, and other categories as appropriate. It will also be tasked with developing recruitment, hiring, and career advancement procedures to achieve greater diversity in the City workforce.

“I am thrilled to put forth a bill that expands critical aspects of equity in the workplace and promotes economic well-being for New Yorkers,” says New York City Council Majority Leader, Laurie A. Cumbo.  “Int. No. 752-A creates an office of diversity and inclusion within DCAS, which will ensure that New York City is a leader in anti-discrimination and equality in the workplace.”

Requiring The Equal Employment Practices Commission To Analyze And Report Annually On Citywide Racial And Ethnic Classification Underutilization

Introduction 755, sponsored by Council Member Mathieu Eugene, would require the Equal Employment Practices Commission (EEPC) to analyze and report annually on whether agencies are meeting their racial and ethnic affirmative employment objectives and, when not, identify the underutilized groups and provide recommendations on corrective action. The EEPC would also be required to review the city’s racial and ethnic classification categories and provide recommendations on whether such categories accurately capture the racial and ethnic composition of the city’s government workforce.

Requiring the Department Of Citywide Administrative Services to Review and Report Annually on the City’s Efforts to Collect Racial and Ethnic Demographic Information

Introduction 756 sponsored by Council Member Mathieu Eugene, would require the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) to include in its annual report an analysis of employee response rates to the city’s efforts to collect racial demographic information of city employees, and whether changes in the racial and ethnic classification categories have an impact on employee response rates.

“In the City of New York, we are fortunate to accommodate a diverse public workforce that is strengthened by the contributions of individuals from a multitude of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. As the Chair of the Civil and Human Rights Committee, I am proud to sponsor Intro 755-A, a bill that will require the Equal Employment Practices Commission to issue an annual report that evaluates the ability of our city agencies to meet their racial and ethnic affirmative employment goals. I believe it is imperative that we take the necessary steps to improve how effectively we are able to retain our workers from minority backgrounds and help them effectively achieve the American dream.  I am also proud to sponsor Intro 756-A, a bill that will improve how the Department of Citywide Administrative Services collects and analyzes employee response rates to racial and ethnic classification data. This bill will also improve the number of categories available for city employees to select in order to be more inclusive in data collection efforts. It is my hope that by passing this legislation, we will take steps to expand the demographics of our government workforce so that they will more accurately reflect the diversity of New York City.” Said Council Member Mathieu Eugene.

Ensuring Fair Student Funding.

Creating a Fair Student Funding Task Force.

Introduction 1174 sponsored by Council Member Mark Treyger would create a task force including Department of Education (DOE) personnel, a representative from the Council, at least one representative from a Community Education Council from each borough, a representative from a union representing teachers, a representative from a union representing principals, a parent of a currently enrolled student, and advocates who specialize in working with vulnerable student populations, to review and make recommendations relating to the formula used by DOE to determine school funding.

Requiring a Single Reporting Bill on Department of Education School Budget Allocations.

Introduction 1014, sponsored by Council Member Mark Treyger, would require the Department of Education to annually submit and post a machine-readable report on all funds allocated to each school citywide, including the amount of funding determined to be owed to the school pursuant to DOE’s fair student funding formula, and the percentage of that amount actually allocated to the school.

Calling Upon the New York City Department of Education to Factor in Poverty as a Weight in the Fair Student Funding Formula.

Resolution 569, sponsored by Council Member Mark Treyger, calls upon the New York City Department of Education to factor in poverty as a weight in the Fair Student Funding formula for schools beginning at fourth grade or later.

“Fair Student Funding is a critical funding stream for our schools, giving school administrators the flexibility to provide the social and emotional supports or enrichment programs that best meet the needs of their respective student populations. My legislation will give stakeholders a seat at the table and help ensure equity and transparency in the distribution of these important resources.” Said Council Member Mark Treyger, Chair of the Committee on Education.

Committee on Technology

Requiring All City Data Be Reported in an Accessible Format.

Introduction 986 sponsored by Council Member Peter Koo, would require that the data contained within required reports and studies be transmitted in a format that makes such data easily accessible.

“Intro 986-A will help streamline government data so that reports, graphs, charts and other critical files submitted to the City Council would be required to be machine-readable so that they could be automatically processed. This will help cut down on paperwork and improve the efficiency of all reporting done by city agencies while simultaneously moving the Council further online and creating a more user-friendly and transparent government.” Said Council Member Peter Koo, Chair of the Technology Committee.

Calling on New York State to Enact the NY Health Program

Resolution 470 sponsored by Council Speaker Corey Johnson, calls on the State Legislature to pass and the Governor to sign A.4738-A/S.4840-A, legislation that would establish the New York Health program, a universal single payer health plan for all New York State residents.

The City Council will also vote on the following finance item(s)…

The Council will vote on four Property Tax Exemptions at the following locations:

West Farms, Bronx

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Rafael Salamanca Jr.’s district, is to preserve 343 units of affordable housing in this two-building complex.

388 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Deborah Rose’s district, is to preserve 122 units of affordable housing.

Turin House, Manhattan

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Helen Rosenthal’s district, is to preserve 189 units of affordable housing.

Langsam 15, Bronx

The purpose of this exemption, located in Council Member Ritchie Torres’s district, is to preserve 60 units of affordable housing.

The Council will also vote to approve property tax exemptions for six properties that are being transferred as a part of Round 10 of the Third Party Transfer Program.

The City Council will also vote on the following land use items:

238 President Street House

Landmark designation of 238 President Street in Carroll Gardens. The building is a grand Anglo-Italianate style house built circa 1853 that has served as a single-family home, the Brooklyn Deaconess Home of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the residence of the Baezes, one of Brooklyn’s most prominent Mexican American families of the early-to-mid 20th century and is located in Council Member Lander’s district.

Hans Christian Memorial Kindergarten

Landmark designation of the Hans Christian Memorial Kindergarten in Carroll Gardens. This Beaux Arts structure was the first purpose-built free kindergarten in Brooklyn and was commissioned by Elmira E. Christian as a model kindergarten and is located in Council Member Lander’s district.

DOT Brooklyn Fleet Services

Site selection and acquisition of approximately 123,600 square feet of property in the Gowanus. The site will serve as a vehicle maintenance and repair facility for the Department of Transportation’s Brooklyn fleet, in Council Member Lander’s district.

Clinton URA Site 7

A new Article XI tax exemption in the Clinton neighborhood of Manhattan to facilitate a new mixed-use building with 103 affordable units. The project is located in Speaker Corey Johnson’s district.

590 Southern Boulevard

A new Article XI tax exemption to facilitate the preservation of 27 residential and two commercial units. The project is located in Council Member Diana Ayala’s district.

JOE Central Brooklyn

An Article XI tax exemption for the “JOE” (r Joint Ownership Entity) Central Brooklyn, a portfolio of 79 residential buildings in the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Brownsville neighborhoods. This tax exemption will facilitate the rehabilitation and preservation of 525 units of affordable housing jointly owned by four community-based non-profits.

464-68 West 51 Street

An Article XI tax exemption in the Clinton neighborhood of Manhattan. to finance the moderate rehabilitation and energy and water efficiency needs of two five-story buildings containing 11residential in Speaker Corey Johnson’s district.

456 Seat Intermediate/ High School Facility

Site selection of a new school in Staten Island. The School Construction Authority plans to construct a new Intermediate and High School facility serving District 75 students with the capacity of up to 456 seats. The school is located in Minority Leader Steve Matteo’s District.

Victory Plaza

An amendment to an Urban Development Action Area Project to facilitate the development of a new residential building containing 135 low-income senior units. This project is located in Council Member Bill Perkin’s district.

 

###