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District 26

Julie Won

Astoria (Central), Astoria (East)-Woodside (North), Queensbridge-Ravenswood-Dutch Kills, Sunnyside Yards (North), Long Island City-Hunters Point, Sunnyside, Woodside, Sunnyside Yards (South), Calvary & Mount Zion Cemeteries, Jackson Heights, Elmhurst, Maspeth

Frequently Asked Questions
Upcoming Meetings and Engagements
Past Meetings and Engagements

We are working with the communities of Astoria, Woodside, Sunnyside, and Dutch Kills to develop a vision that will improve the vital corridors of Northern Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue. In October 2023, our office launched a comprehensive community planning process to develop our collective future and demand investment along these two central corridors.

Until June 2024, our office will be hosting a series of meetings and engagements to hear from a diversity of residents and small businesses about how we can best celebrate and improve Northern Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue in Sunnyside, Woodside, Astoria, and Dutch Kills. 

Heart of the District: Comprehensive Community Planning: Frequently Asked Questions

What is the geographic study area for the comprehensive planning process?

This comprehensive planning process will study the corridors of Northern Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue, bounded by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (I-278) to the east and Queens Boulevard to the west. Council Member Won’s office chose to focus on these corridors, because they are vital thoroughfares through the district that require careful planning and investment in order to better serve the community’s needs.

Is this a rezoning?

No. This is a comprehensive planning process that will identify community priorities for the corridors of Northern Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue. If the community priorities that emerge through the engagement process identify rezoning as a tool to address their needs, then the Council Member’s Office may explore rezoning as an option. However, the intention of this process is not to rezone.

What will the final comprehensive plan contain?

The final plan will include community priorities that emerge from the engagement process and recommendations for how the Council Member’s Office can advocate for those priorities. For example, if street safety emerges as a key priority, the plan might contain a map of intersections that require safety improvements and a list of demands to the NYC Department of Transportation that the Council Member can use to advocate on behalf of the district.

What will Council Member Won do with the final comprehensive plan?

The final plan can be used by Council Member Won in three major ways. The recommendations within the plan can guide how Council Member Won votes in City Council on land use applications in the district to ensure private land use proposals address community needs. Secondly, the Council Member can advocate for investments and changes for other needs beyond land use, including but not limited to capital investments, street design, and public space. Finally, in the event that City government seeks to embark on a formal planning or rezoning process in the study area, the plan will serve as an existing  set of community priorities that the City must address. By conducting community engagement early, the community can be prepared for any future planning initiatives sanctioned by the City.

Who is paying for this work?

Council Member Won and Council Speaker Adams funded this plan through NYC Council discretionary funding. The funding was allocated to the non-profit organization Hester Street to carry out the work in close partnership with the Office of Council Member Won.

Who is Hester Street and what is their role in the project?

Hester Street is an urban planning, design and community development nonprofit that works to ensure neighborhoods are shaped by the people who live in them. Hester Street is working closely with the Office of Council Member Won to lead the community-driven land use planning process.  Learn more about Hester Street here.

How is this process different from the Long Island City planning process?

The Office of Council Member Won is undertaking two comprehensive planning processes simultaneously. The other initiative, called One LIC, is a planning process that will likely culminate in zoning changes to part of Long Island City, to be voted on by NYC Council. One LIC is led by the NYC Department of City Planning and consultant WXY. 

The two planning processes focus on different neighborhoods within Council District 26. Another key difference is that One LIC was initiated by the Department of City Planning as part of a formal rezoning process, whereas Heart of the District was initiated by Council Member Won’s office and is not tied to a formal rezoning. The intent of Heart of the District is to identify community priorities to drive future planning and investment in the study area.

You can read more about One LIC here.

Who should participate in this process?

All residents, workers, students, and frequent visitors to the study area should participate! The planning process is prioritizing people traditionally excluded from the planning process, including but not limited to individuals who are low-income, non-English speaking, housing-insecure, or differently-abled. Engagements will include live translation services and childcare in order to be accessible to as many people as possible.

How can I get involved?

From now through June 2024, Council Member Won and Hester Street will be hosting public meetings, focus groups, and other engagements throughout the district to hear more from residents. To receive project updates and learn about future meetings, join Council Member Won’s email newsletter here

Join us and share your vision for the Heart of the District! 

Upcoming Meetings and Engagements

  • Our third and final town hall will be on Wednesday, June 26 from 6-8 PM at the Museum of the Moving Image, located at 36-01 35th Ave.

We asked you and your communities how you would improve Northern Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue. Join us to review the findings and share your ideas.

Past Meetings and Engagements

  • The first public town hall was held on Thursday, November 16 from 6:30-8:30 PM at Legal Outreach Astoria, located at 36-14 35th Street.
  • The second public town hall was held on Monday, May 6 from 6-8 PM at PS 11 Kathryn Phelan located at 54-25 Skillman Ave.

About Our Community Planning Partner

Hester Street is an urban planning, design and community development nonprofit that works to ensure neighborhoods are shaped by the people who live in them. Hester Street is working closely with the Office of Council Member Won to lead the community-driven land use planning process.  Learn more about Hester Street here.

Stay Up to Date

To receive project updates and learn about future meetings, join Council Member Won’s email newsletter here