Published June 1, 2024, 12:07 p.m. ET

By Rich Calder

Migrant-friendly laws that limit local law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with the feds on immigration matters would be repealed under new legislation to be considered by the NYC Council.

Council members Robert Holden (D-Queens) and Joe Borelli (R-Staten Island) told The Post they’ll introduce a bill Thursday that would roll back so-called “sanctuary city” laws approved from 2014-2018 under then-Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Some of the laws prohibit the NYPD, and Correction and Probation departments from cooperating with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents unless the cases involve suspected terrorists or serious public safety risks.

Migrants lined up outside many wearing winter coats
New City Council legislation seeks to repeal laws instituted under former Mayor Bill de Blasio that severely limit local law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with the feds on immigration matters. AP

The bill — which is likely to face strident objections from the Council’s left-wing Democratic majority — would also reverse rules prohibiting city agencies from partnering with ICE to enforce federal immigration laws.

“Sanctuary city laws put all New Yorkers, both immigrants and longtime residents, in danger by preventing the NYPD and DOC from working with ICE,” said Holden, a moderate Dem. “We do not need to import criminals, and only 23 years since 9/11, we have forgotten the deadly consequences of poor interagency communication. We must repeal these laws immediately.”

Queens Councilman Robert Holden speaking in front of a line of flags while standing at a podium in front of a crowd
Queens Councilman Robert Holden said “sanctuary city laws put all New Yorkers, both immigrants and longtime residents, in danger by preventing the NYPD and [the Department of Correction] from working with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.” Getty Images

The NYPD had no choice but to cut the Venezuelan-born Ibarra loose — instead of turning him over to federal immigration officials — because he didn’t have any major crime convictions.

“Like most things in New York, sanctuary city policy is a social experiment gone off the rails,” said Borelli. “All the problems with these local laws came out during the public-hearing process, but the Council just stepped harder on the gas pedal.”

In February, Mayor Eric Adams called for the rules to be loosened so migrants “suspected” of “serious” crimes could also be turned over to ICE — as they once were under sanctuary city policies implemented as early as 1989 under ex-mayors Ed Koch and Michael Bloomberg.

Migrants lined up, with many wearing white blankets around their shoulders
Migrants who crossed the southern border in January are dropped off in Trenton, NJ before getting transported to NYC. Christopher Sadowski
Bill de Blasio
Former Mayor Bill de Blasio’s put policies place to help protect migrants, but critics say the rules are too lenient and must be repealed. AP

But Council Speaker Adrienne Adams shot down the idea a day later, saying she and the rest of the Council’s progressive Democratic majority wouldn’t be considering any rule changes.

Mayor Adams plans to review the legislation, said his spokesperson Kayla Mamelak.

The Council Speaker’s Office declined comment.