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District 5

Ben Kallos

Upper East Side's Yorkville, Lenox Hill, Carnegie Hill, Roosevelt Island, Midtown East, Sutton Place, El Barrio in East Harlem

By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed

New York City officials declared a climate emergency in an effort to mobilize local and national responses to stall global warming.

It’s the largest city in the US, with over 8.62 million inhabitants.

The New York City Council passed the legislation Wednesday, calling for an immediate response to the global climate crises.

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By Ethan Geringer-Sameth

Kallos’ bill is sponsored by 31 other Council members in the 51-seat chamber and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. It would tip the balance toward a full match and would also codify into the city Campaign Finance Act relevant pieces of the ballot referendum approved by voters last year.

Supporters of a full public match argue the system still leaves the city’s rich and powerful with outsized influence, especially in citywide races where candidates rely more on large contributions than candidates for City Council do.

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By Graham Rayman

“Scaffolding is there to protect us from falling buildings, but what’s going to protect us from falling scaffolding,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “With scaffolding falling throughout our city, scaffolding companies have proven that they can’t be trusted to self-certify anymore. Department of Buildings must inspect every scaffold when it goes up to ensure that it will actually keep us safe.”

Kallos cited seven scaffolding collapses dating back to February 2017 that resulted in either property damage or injury.

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District 2 as a whole is slightly below its full enrollment capacity, but elementary schools in the portions of the district represented by Kallos and his Council colleague Keith Powers — encompassing the East Side from roughly 14th to 96th Streets — are overcrowded, operating slightly over combined capacity as of the 2016-2017 school year.

Kallos is hopeful that the new seats will reduce overcrowding, allow more students to attend their school of choice and offset future capacity needs resulting from new residential projects in the neighborhood.

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“Having an officer focused on bike lanes will mean fewer vehicles blocking the bike lane and more people obeying the law,” Kallos said, adding, “We hear so much in the 17th and 19th Precincts about bike safety issues, and the commanding officers are responding to concerns and are doing more than I think anywhere else in the city.”

Kallos and Powers have partnered with the DOT and Bike New York to sponsor bike safety training sessions.

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By Rebecca Baird-Remba

Developers and landlords have always been at the mercy of city politicians, and Mayor Bill de Blasio’s ambitious housing agenda has further highlighted the tensions between real estate interests and City Hall.

While only a select few elected officials get a place on the Power 100, there are plenty of folks in and out of City Hall that are paving the way for development and fighting for tenants’ rights.

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By Sean Piccoli and Elizabeth A. Harris

Among the parade of speakers at Wednesday’s announcement was City Councilman Ben Kallos, who recounted his own experience with the stigma of subsidized school meals.

He grew up on the Upper East Side and, like many of his neighbors, attended Bronx High School of Science. But his mother’s income in his single-parent household was low enough that he qualified for reduced-price lunches — a fact he tried to hide from his peers by not eating.

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By Elizabeth A. Harris

Councilman Ben Kallos is expected to introduce a bill on Wednesday that would require the Education Department to release additional data such as the number of applications each school receives, how many offers it extends and where students live. Credit…Emon Hassan for The New York Times

The department already releases information on school capacity, with yearly updates on whether schools have too many students or too few.

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