Expense Budget      

The Expense Budget covers the costs of running our city. It pays for the sanitation worker who picks up your garbage, powers the lights at your local library, provides social services. Funds are set aside to operate each city agency. This also includes the Debt Service, the City’s annual loan payment for long‑term Capital Projects for which the City borrows State & Federal money.

Explore the Expense Budget

Adopted Expense Budget FY2017

Agency: $59,003,568,122
Non-agency: $23,112,222,122

Total: $82,115,790,244

* Non-agency funds support multiple agencies, not any one specific agency.

Actual expense budget over time FY2002-FY2015

Council’s goals

In negotiations with the Mayor, the Council ensures that key investments in the budget meet the needs of NYC’s diverse neighborhoods. Highlights in this year’s budget (FY 2017) include investments such as libraries, city youth, support for immigrant communities, and strengthening city reserves.

Schedule C

During each year’s budget process, the Council and its Members assign discretionary funds to not-for-profit organizations and agency initiatives to meet needs and fill gaps in City Agency services and local projects. This funding is also called “Schedule C.”

Schedule C specifies how certain funds in the Expense Budget are spent. (There’s also Schedule C funding for projects in the Capital Budget).

Unlike competitively-awarded Agency contracts, discretionary funds may only be awarded for a single year.

Schedule C funds by Type FY2017

Agency Funding Conditions

The Council attaches certain conditions to City agency funding during budget negotiations with the Mayoral Administration. These conditions usually require agencies to provide data to the City Council, but can also require other types of action. These “terms and conditions” are a tool the Council uses for accountability, oversight, and documentation.

Learn more about terms and conditions

Capital Budget      

The Capital Budget covers larger long‑term investments in facilities & infrastructure, or Capital Projects. Examples include the construction of public schools, street maintenance, and parks improvements. These investments often take years to build, and their costs may be distributed over time.

Adopted Capital Budget FY2017

Total: $56,993,532,501

Actual capital commitments over time (city, state, and federal funds) FY2002-FY2015

Capital projects include…

Capital Discretionary Funding

Each year, during the budget process, Members of the Council assign discretionary funds to capital projects to meet local needs and fill gaps in City Agency projects. This funding is also called “Resolution A.”

Capital Discretionary Funding specifies how certain funds in the Capital Budget are spent. (There’s also Schedule C funding for discretionary spending in the Expense Budget).

Council Members also use Participatory Budgeting to decide how to spend a certain amount of Capital Discretionary funding. Those Members who choose to join Participatory Budgeting, give at least $1 million from their budget for the whole community to participate in decision-making through a public vote.

Unlike competitively-awarded Agency contracts, discretionary funds may only be awarded for a single year.

Revenue Budget      

The Revenue Budget outlines money expected from taxes, State & Federal aid, and other sources of revenue. It determines the maximum amount in the Expense Budget, as the City is required to have a balanced budget.

Adopted Revenue Budget FY2017

City Revenue
State & Federal Revenue

Total: $82,115,790,244

Actual revenue over time FY2002-FY2015

Revenue sources include…


Supporting Documents